Alameda County Grand Jury

Your public watchdog ensuring openness and integrity in government

How To Become A Grand Juror

Applications for Grand Jury service are accepted throughout the year.  Official recruitment begins in January and final selection of the jury takes place at a public hearing shortly before July 1st of each year.  Grand Jurors serve for one fiscal year (July 1 through June 30).  The process starts with Superior Court judges interviewing applicants who meet the basic qualifications. The court has the responsibility to select 30 finalists divided among the county’s supervisorial districts.  During the final selection hearing, the names of the 30 finalists are placed in a selection bin.  The Presiding Judge can hold over up to ten jurors to serve a second term, and once those holdover jurors are chosen, the remaining slots are filed by random selection from the 30 finalists to make up a panel of 19 jurors total.  Empty jury seating box in court room

The qualifications to become a grand juror require:

  • US citizenship
  • Residence in Alameda County for at least one year
  • At least 18 years of age
  • Sufficient knowledge of the English language.
 

Convicted felons and those who have been discharged from service on a Grand Jury within one year are ineligible for Grand Jury service. 

Persons selected for Grand Jury service must make a significant time commitment for a period of one fiscal year.  The jury meets on Wednesdays and Thursdays (in Oakland) but most grand jurors devote additional time to their service. 

Soon after the selection process, empaneled grand jurors receive a month long orientation on local government and must complete a statement of economic interests (FPPC Form 700). Grand jurors are provided training and support throughout their service.  They must be willing to participate in questioning witnesses, reading and analyzing investigative materials, and in writing their final reports.  Grand juror are paid $15 per day plus mileage and/or public transportation reimbursement. 


Juror Demographics

Jury demographics are important and help to maintain a system that is fair and equitable to all who choose to embark on the endeavor, and provides open and transparent information to the public about the applicant pool.